Sunday, 21 February 2010

Battle Beyond the Stars

A lot of people will probably disagree with what I'm about to say, but I think that the production value of a comic book will do more to make or break that book than the production value of a film.

I'm not suggesting to two are comparable in costs, that would be absurd. However of the two, one is made or broken more so than the other by the overall aesthetic quality.

That doesn't mean to say that the most beautifully put together books are guaranteed success, but rather that the reader/storyteller relationship is more likely to be maintained between a quality book.

To put it another way, you are more likely to be snapped out of a reality in a comic book if something in its production is off.

In all story telling media, a major key to maintaining the reader/storyteller relationship is creating a believable universe which doesn't jar the reader back into the real world.

In books this can be done with bad prose, in film a technical hiccup or bad acting, and in comics bad writing, art, coloring, lettering, word placement, page layout can all break this relationship.

However, the breaks that come from the reader/storyteller relationship in film, are forgiven more readily than in comics. It takes an absolute break down in the method of presenting the media (sound dropping out, picture going dead) to break that relationship totally.

Comics are less forgiving.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is interesting. Clearly, you get immersed and really pulled into comics; no wonder you love the form so much. I, on the other hand, usually don't (there are exceptions of course, but I can't think of any right now). Therefore, I don't have such high expectations for the production quality of comics. However, films do pull me in and usually captivate me (well, except New Moon...yawnnnnn), so I'm more jarred when something seems badly done or off.

I'm curious WHY.

MRs

剩沒底天 said...

Man proposes, God disposes...................................................

Monkey Pipe said...

I get immersed in comics for several reasons - one, I find the purity of the creative process so much more of a draw-in (no pun intended), I find the combination of the art and the written word does something to me to allow me to be lost in the word created there so much easier than a film, and finally modern actors get on my nerves for the most part - so I never really get lost in a film, but rather find myself watching so and so in such film.

Anonymous said...

Hhmm...I hear what you're saying about modern actors. Yes, that can be a let-down.

However, comic book art....my goodness! If the art in them was more...well...artistic I would be so much more willing to give them a try. However, in reality it seems like the artists think they're in some sort of competition of who can draw the biggest, bulging muscles. And I'm not even going to go into the women's attributes. PLEASE!!! How can I take that seriously at all??? It's just so SILLY!!! So, then I ask myself, "What makes art artistic and not just silly?" My first thought is that true art captures some sort of truth. Some sort of honesty. And I personally think that most comic book art has very VERY far way to go with that.

Of course not yours and JC's!

Mrs.

Monkey Pipe said...

Weeeellll - the good artists (writers and art teams) treat these stories, in my opinion, like Olympian tales. We are dealing with as close to gods as you can get, in hyper-real universes.

There are those that take it too far, but for me they are like snap-shot moments, each panel is a sculpture in a heightened instant - similar to the Tate's Hercules vs the Serpent, or even the David...

Basically, I forgive to a certain degree, but am not a fan of the sexist, pin-up style of art myself...

Anonymous said...

OOooo...I'm so glad you mentioned the David. You know I love that, so of course I'll take the bite. Did you notice when looking at it/him that, yes, he's fairly beautiful and ideal (that was what MB was going for), but along with that there is a vulnerability to his pose and expression. His hands are graceful, he's slightly curved through the body, his eyes aren't quite sure he's up to this fight. There is a softness and dare I say it, a femininity to him that I think captures people's hearts. If he was just another buff stud muffin with bulging muscles I really don't think that piece of rock would be so loved, affecting, and memorable.

Love,
Mrs

微笑每一天 said...

very popular to u! ........................................